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ATV Quiz: Win A Yamaha Thunder Pack

Aug. 31, 2009

ATV Quiz: Win A Yamaha Thunder Pack

By: John Davis

Yamaha is very proactive in promoting safe and responsible OHV (off-highway vehicle) use. This not only means they are trying to keep guys like me from having those “watch this” moments, but also taking care of those beautiful places we all enjoy. A Yamaha Thunder Pack to the first correct answer that doesn’t come from a TOC Finalist. (Let’s spread the swag around.)

Scenario: You are 15 miles into an OHV trail, and you come to a creek crossing. The water is below your foot pegs and there is very little current. It is the designated crossing area for the trail and the streambed looks solid. Your Grizzly 550 is a 4x4, so you are sure it can handle the stream.

Question: Several reasons why you don’t go through the creek with the throttle pegged and the mullet flyin’ jump out at ya. The first being not wanting your melon cracked open by impact. The other two reasons are what I’m looking for: one environmental and the other personal safety.

—John Davis

Aug. 31, 2009 | Permalink

Comments (14)

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Top Rated
from amp_sims wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

If your fifteen miles into it your atv's engine and exhaust is sure to be hot at the least and if you go barreling off into the stream you will splash water onto the motor and exhaust. This will create alot of steam wich can very easily burn you badly. The enviromental risks that go along with this at the least you will be washing oil, grease, grime,and fuel spillage off as well as causing unecessary wash out and disruption of the steam bed.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from lovetoshoot1972 wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

When crossing streams and drainages tread lightly calls for limited breaking and acceleration to limit disturbing the bottem gravel and rocks. And as for safety, any hydroplaning is a moment of limited or no control that should be avoided in any trail riding opportunity.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from freesoul1 wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

yea be eco frendly and watch out for outhers.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from philly123 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

a danm rock can pop ya tire
the creek could be deeper than ya thought
could get stuck in the mud
you could hyperplane

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from brw7979 wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

You dont want to hit the stream at throttle full as being its gonna disrupt the way that the crossing has been before you were there and you should leave it the way that it was when you got there. "Tread Lightly".
Then if the water is muddy at all you really wont be able to tell what is there, there could be a large rock, deeper hole etc, and hitting the water at any fast pace speed will cause a hydroplane and you wont be able to control your vehicle and once you do get to the other side you possible wont have good control and possible flip, and then once on the other side your gonna tear up the ground and leave all kinds of tracks. There again "tread lightly".

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John Davis wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

craigbrymer, shoot me an e-mail at hookjawed@sbcglobal.net so I can get some info to send you the prize.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

"Tread Lightly",is a motto that one should adhere to, while using our nations wilderness areas.

Proceed slowly to avoid splashing,if the ignition system gets wet,the vehicle may stall.
Erosion and sending silt downstream will be lessened if one slowly and cautiosly crosses a stream,while looking and paying attention to the area immediately in front of the vehicle. A rock could suddenly protrude and severe a brake line, sending brake fluid downstream polluting the immediate area and the inhabitants of the water.

Wet brakes do not stop the vehicle as effectively as dry brakes. If one doesn't take the time to dry the brakes,an accident may be inevitable. You can dry the brakes faster by driving the vehicle slowly while applying light pressure on both brakes.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from matouse3 wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Anyone else having problems with this site. The last couple days it has changed from the usual to a very basis, site map style. I don't believe its my computer, but not sure. Just checking to see if there is some work being done or what as this is rather annoying. Thanks for the help. --Also, was there a winner chosen for the archery challenge?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hobob wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

Going full bore through the stream would greatly increase the erosion of the bank and the amount of sediment in the water. If you stall out its a long walk out and even peg deep water would splash in an intake.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

You dont want to disturb the creek bottom and you dont want to hydroplane or hit a rock injuring yourself and damaging your grizzly, possibly alowing oil or gas to harm the wildlife downstream.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from goldbukl wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

Hey John- It's been since Nashville that I have posted or spoke with you and let me just say the competition was great. As far as the above scenerio and question I can think of numerous reasons. As already mentioned the terrain that is sight unseen and the care for the wildlife but as far as personaly safety I would have to think more importantly the care of yourself and your ride. Taking the crossing with the mind set that there is a 15 mile walk back on the trial not meant for pedestrain traffic. The environmental inpact follows the same suit. God forbid the ATV slips, slides and busts a case and spews oil or fluid in the creek now you have not only contaminated the creek but you have a 15 mile hike to think about your stupid mistake of being a speed demon. Anyway it was nice meeting ya'll in Nashville and I hope to make it next year. I started thinking about the competition because I am wathcing the CMA music fest on TV right now. Well later ya'll.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from craigbrymer wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

Whenever an ATV rider encounters waterways they should always decelerate before crossing. Doing so can prevent the SURPRISE face plant on your handlebars if you encounter a deeper hole than anticipated, a large rock or other obstacle you didn’t notice was there. Fifteen miles back in the sticks, you’d better be absolutely certain you don’t get careless.

Besides personal safety, shedding some speed prior to crossing a stream keeps ATVs from carving progressively deeper holes as they hit the base of the streambed and begin to climb out. This loosens the gravel, sand, or sediment on the stream bottom, which begins to wash away over time. Erosion of bottom sediments is known to wreak havoc on fish spawning, aquatic insects and the entire stream ecosystem.

Damage to the environment closes more lands to ATVs than anything else. Using good judgment and a little common sense we can not only ride safely, but ride in a way that protects the woods and fields we love so much and ensures we continue to have places to ride.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Flyfish_fox wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

Environmental concerns are the impact to stream wildlife that call the riverbottom home. (insect, mussels, fish fry living among the rocks. Blazing through the river at high speed would cause unnecessary damage.
Safety Concerns are traveling unknown terrain should always be at a safe controlled speed.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from duckboy007 wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

No TOC finalists? John, you're no fun. Haha. I like this one, good luck to everyone else. Everyone have a safe and enjoyable Opening Day tomorrow, or Saturday if that's your opener. Those grey darts are alot of fun!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from craigbrymer wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

Whenever an ATV rider encounters waterways they should always decelerate before crossing. Doing so can prevent the SURPRISE face plant on your handlebars if you encounter a deeper hole than anticipated, a large rock or other obstacle you didn’t notice was there. Fifteen miles back in the sticks, you’d better be absolutely certain you don’t get careless.

Besides personal safety, shedding some speed prior to crossing a stream keeps ATVs from carving progressively deeper holes as they hit the base of the streambed and begin to climb out. This loosens the gravel, sand, or sediment on the stream bottom, which begins to wash away over time. Erosion of bottom sediments is known to wreak havoc on fish spawning, aquatic insects and the entire stream ecosystem.

Damage to the environment closes more lands to ATVs than anything else. Using good judgment and a little common sense we can not only ride safely, but ride in a way that protects the woods and fields we love so much and ensures we continue to have places to ride.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from matouse3 wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Anyone else having problems with this site. The last couple days it has changed from the usual to a very basis, site map style. I don't believe its my computer, but not sure. Just checking to see if there is some work being done or what as this is rather annoying. Thanks for the help. --Also, was there a winner chosen for the archery challenge?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

"Tread Lightly",is a motto that one should adhere to, while using our nations wilderness areas.

Proceed slowly to avoid splashing,if the ignition system gets wet,the vehicle may stall.
Erosion and sending silt downstream will be lessened if one slowly and cautiosly crosses a stream,while looking and paying attention to the area immediately in front of the vehicle. A rock could suddenly protrude and severe a brake line, sending brake fluid downstream polluting the immediate area and the inhabitants of the water.

Wet brakes do not stop the vehicle as effectively as dry brakes. If one doesn't take the time to dry the brakes,an accident may be inevitable. You can dry the brakes faster by driving the vehicle slowly while applying light pressure on both brakes.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from amp_sims wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

If your fifteen miles into it your atv's engine and exhaust is sure to be hot at the least and if you go barreling off into the stream you will splash water onto the motor and exhaust. This will create alot of steam wich can very easily burn you badly. The enviromental risks that go along with this at the least you will be washing oil, grease, grime,and fuel spillage off as well as causing unecessary wash out and disruption of the steam bed.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from goldbukl wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

Hey John- It's been since Nashville that I have posted or spoke with you and let me just say the competition was great. As far as the above scenerio and question I can think of numerous reasons. As already mentioned the terrain that is sight unseen and the care for the wildlife but as far as personaly safety I would have to think more importantly the care of yourself and your ride. Taking the crossing with the mind set that there is a 15 mile walk back on the trial not meant for pedestrain traffic. The environmental inpact follows the same suit. God forbid the ATV slips, slides and busts a case and spews oil or fluid in the creek now you have not only contaminated the creek but you have a 15 mile hike to think about your stupid mistake of being a speed demon. Anyway it was nice meeting ya'll in Nashville and I hope to make it next year. I started thinking about the competition because I am wathcing the CMA music fest on TV right now. Well later ya'll.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

You dont want to disturb the creek bottom and you dont want to hydroplane or hit a rock injuring yourself and damaging your grizzly, possibly alowing oil or gas to harm the wildlife downstream.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from freesoul1 wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

yea be eco frendly and watch out for outhers.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hobob wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

Going full bore through the stream would greatly increase the erosion of the bank and the amount of sediment in the water. If you stall out its a long walk out and even peg deep water would splash in an intake.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John Davis wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

craigbrymer, shoot me an e-mail at hookjawed@sbcglobal.net so I can get some info to send you the prize.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from brw7979 wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

You dont want to hit the stream at throttle full as being its gonna disrupt the way that the crossing has been before you were there and you should leave it the way that it was when you got there. "Tread Lightly".
Then if the water is muddy at all you really wont be able to tell what is there, there could be a large rock, deeper hole etc, and hitting the water at any fast pace speed will cause a hydroplane and you wont be able to control your vehicle and once you do get to the other side you possible wont have good control and possible flip, and then once on the other side your gonna tear up the ground and leave all kinds of tracks. There again "tread lightly".

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philly123 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

a danm rock can pop ya tire
the creek could be deeper than ya thought
could get stuck in the mud
you could hyperplane

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from duckboy007 wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

No TOC finalists? John, you're no fun. Haha. I like this one, good luck to everyone else. Everyone have a safe and enjoyable Opening Day tomorrow, or Saturday if that's your opener. Those grey darts are alot of fun!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lovetoshoot1972 wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

When crossing streams and drainages tread lightly calls for limited breaking and acceleration to limit disturbing the bottem gravel and rocks. And as for safety, any hydroplaning is a moment of limited or no control that should be avoided in any trail riding opportunity.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Flyfish_fox wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

Environmental concerns are the impact to stream wildlife that call the riverbottom home. (insect, mussels, fish fry living among the rocks. Blazing through the river at high speed would cause unnecessary damage.
Safety Concerns are traveling unknown terrain should always be at a safe controlled speed.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report

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